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Affichage des articles du octobre, 2017

retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!

Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements! Unless stated otherwise, I don't plan these changes to be part of retro-gtk 0.14 and I have no idea when they will be implemented. If I say anything you know to be wrong or if you know something which could help the library's development, please share it in the comments!Stabilization of the APIAs stated in the previous article, I want retro-gtk's API to stop breaking as much as it did in the past. Starting with 0.14, we will avoid API and ABI breaks as much as possible, and if we do any we will document them properly. The API should be stable but given that some big changes are coming I don't feel comfortable promising proper stability just yet.GitlabI requested to move retro-gtk to GNOME's GitLab. …

retro-gtk: Renaissance

This is the second article in a small series about retro-gtk, I recommend you to read the first one, retro-gtk: Postmortem, before this one.In the previous article I listed some problems I encountered while developing and using retro-gtk; in this one I will present some solutions I implemented to fix them! ☺ All that is presented in this article is part of the newly-released retro-gtk 0.13.1, which is the first version of the 0.14 development cycle.Changing the ScopeThe Libretro API is tricky: lots of little details need to be handled properly and it isn't always very clear how to do so. By mimicking this API, retro-gtk inherited its complexity, making it way more complex than it should be as there aren't many different ways for a Libretro frontend to handle the cores correctly. retro-gtk was forwarding the complexity of the Libretro API to its users rather than abstracting it.About a year ago I decided to slowly change the scope of the library. In the previous article, I desc…

retro-gtk: Postmortem

This article is the first of a small series about retro-gtk, a library I develop in tandem with Games and which allows it to use Libretro cores. This first article focuses on the initial goals of the library, its design and the problems that arose during its development, while the next ones will focus on what I am working on to fix these problems.Libretro? retro-gtk? Are These Edible?The Libretro project defines an API to be implemented by so-called Libretro cores — typically video game console emulators — to expose them as shared libraries with a common ABI. These cores can then be used by so-called Libretro frontends via this API. Here is the main C header if you want to know what it actually looks like.You can see Libretro as a videogame console emulator plugin definition without a plugin system to make it usable.Initially, retro-gtk was designed and implemented as a library easing the use of Libretro cores from higher level languages like Vala. It allowed to dynamically load cores…